Farming at Easter – An Interview with English Farmer Millie Smith

As part of our rural community blog, we sit down and speak to farmers about all things farming. In our first post we spoke to Millie (@thesheepmidwife), who used to work in the public services …

As part of our rural community blog, we sit down and speak to farmers about all things farming. In our first post we spoke to Millie (@thesheepmidwife), who used to work in the public services but is now a shepherdess based in Kent, England. She’s given us a little update on the week building up to Easter weekend.

Easter is almost here and we are currently enjoying watching lambs race around the fields together as the sun goes down. They have grown on so much since lambing, which is just under a month ago now.

Like any job, there are always the good and bad days; you have to quickly learn to deal with those bad days when you start farming. Last week we had just one of those “bad” days…

Some of Millie’s flock! Follow Millie on Instagram: @thesheepmidwife

We made an expensive mistake by losing a bottle of Scabivax, we had another lamb taken by a badger in the night and to top it all off, we had a lamb die without any sign of being wrong. It was fine the night before then not the next day. It’s odd but also very typical of sheep unfortunately!

On the move! Follow Millie on Instagram: @thesheepmidwife

On another note; Easter is coming up, but we don’t get an Easter break as farmers, as there are still lots of jobs to do – it really is a 24/7 job! With the weather getting warmer more flies are appearing – you really have to be on the ball with your sheep checks as sheep are very susceptible to fly strike. To try and prevent this we spent all day on Sunday dagging out the dirty wool on the ewes bums and spraying them with crovect to try and prevent the flies laying their eggs on them. All I will say is I LOVE who ever invented waterproof overalls because I was covered after that hard day’s work!

This year’s lambs have come on so much! Instagram (@thesheepmidwife)

Looking at some of my photos of a few of this year’s lambs it’s crazy to think that they were born a month ago. Lambing almost feels like it’s over before it’s started with how busy it gets throughout!

If you’re a farmer and you’d like to contribute in our campaign to raise awareness for the incredible work in British agriculture, please drop us a DM on Instagram – @aplanrural